Monthly Archives: July 2009

Digging It

Archaeology is how we come to understand who we are. The traces that remain of the distant past are being obliterated across the globe — submerged behind new dams, bulldozed to make way for freeways and high-rises — and that’s … Continue reading

Posted in evolution, random musings | Tagged , | 6 Comments

Down in the Trenches

The trouble with free software is, sometimes you get what you pay for. Today I’ve been trying to get Csound to read real-time MIDI input (from a physical keyboard) and play notes or respond to slider moves. No luck whatever. … Continue reading

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When Failure Is Not an Option

I’m not at all sure what I’d like to do until the gravedigger comes, but I’d like to be doing something. So I did what any good 21st century geek would do: I googled “setting personal goals.” Most of the … Continue reading

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Nailing Down Jello

Having dropped out of college in the Sixties (long story…) I have a recurring fascination with the idea of returning to school to finally get my B.A. Maybe even a Master’s. Why not? The main reason why not: It would … Continue reading

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What’s Old Is Made New

Many years ago, I owned a Serge Modular synthesizer. It was an amazing beast, and I wish I still had it. Purely for nostalgia and sex appeal; I doubt it would still be in working order, and even if it … Continue reading

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Score for Games

Text-based games are not, by their very nature, multimedia-rich experiences. The developers of various game authoring systems have added, over the years, a few limited bits of media support. Authors can, for instance, clear the screen and show a still … Continue reading

Posted in Interactive Fiction, music, technology | Tagged | 2 Comments

Super Collision

Being at loose ends this week, I decided to take a close look at SuperCollider. I’ve spoken to musicians who love it and use it extensively. These are experimental musicians, you understand, most of them working in university environments. Even … Continue reading

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